Blowin' in the Wind: Global Green at the Pole

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It's an awesome start to the new year for Global Green friend and board member Sebastian Copeland and Eric McNair-Landry, who successfully completed a three-month transcontinental crossing of Antarctica. The team started in November 2011 and reached their goal on skis and kites in 81 days. The Antarctica Legacy Crossing -- 100 years after Roald Amundsen and Robert Falcon Scott reached the South Pole -- was a historic, three-month journey for the travel team. They became the first to reach the Pole of Inaccessibility (POI) from the Eastern coast of Antarctica without outside support or motorized transportation (in the photo above, they are next to a bust of Lenin, the only remaining sign of a Russian station that was abandoned more than 50 years ago); they also linked the POI to the geographic South Pole, opening the route for the first time without motorized transportation or outside assistance; finally, they opened a never-before traveled course linking the Antarctic coasts east to west, via two of its poles. We will eagerly await the documentary Sebastian plans to release, as well as a book of photographs documenting the expedition. More on his website and blog.

Eric McNair-Landry successfully completed a three-month transcontinental crossing of
Antarctica. The team started on November 5th, 2011, on the east coast of the continent and in total
covered 3,854 km (approx. 4100 adjusted km or 2,600 miles) on skis and kites, in 81 days.
The Antarctica Legacy Crossing -- 100 years after Roald Amundsen and Robert Falcon Scott reached the South Pole --
was a historic, three-month journey for the travel team. They became the first to reach the Pole of Inaccessibility (POI) from the Eastern Coast of Antarctica, without outside support or motorized transportation (in the photo above, they are next to a bust of Lenin, the only remaining mark from Russian station that was abandoned more than 50 years ago; they linked the POI to the geographic South Pole, opening the route for the first time without motorized transportation or outside assistance; finally, they opened a never-before traveled course linking the Antarctic coasts east to west, via two of its poles.