Los Angeles, Vote NO ON S with Global Green

Global Green is a member of a diverse coalition of partners who are rallying against a ban on development in Los Angeles: Measure S. Global Green supports cities and neighborhood organizations in Los Angeles and throughout the U.S. by: conducting assessments of neighborhoods’ sustainability; identifying and engaging stakeholders and community members; and making recommendations ranging from policy intervention, to development strategy, to helping “activate” urban spaces through events and tactical urbanism.

Photo by Joe Linton/Streetsblog L.A. Global Green provides affordable LEED for Homes Certification for affordable multi-family developments, such as Casa Yondé, a 52-unit affordable housing development (18 units set-aside for supportive housing for homeless households) which Global Green Certified LEED Platinum in 2015. Above, Blanca Mendez, a resident of Casa Yondé in Koreatown, emphasized the importance of safe, affordable housing for all. Casa Yondé required a general plan amendment, which Measure S would ban.

Photo by Joe Linton/Streetsblog L.A.

Global Green provides affordable LEED for Homes Certification for affordable multi-family developments, such as Casa Yondé, a 52-unit affordable housing development (18 units set-aside for supportive housing for homeless households) which Global Green Certified LEED Platinum in 2015. Above, Blanca Mendez, a resident of Casa Yondé in Koreatown, emphasized the importance of safe, affordable housing for all. Casa Yondé required a general plan amendment, which Measure S would ban.

Time and time again, our assessments and engagement bring up the need in communities in Los Angeles and throughout the U.S. for affordable housing. “Gentrification” is a concern in all of the mid-sized to large cities we’ve visited. Often, one of the only tools a neighborhood has to combat gentrification is to shore-up or lock-down its affordable housing supply. This is accomplished by keeping property affordable and in the neighborhood residents’ ownership (through a Land Trust such as Trust South LA) and by developing more affordable housing (creating more supply to assuage demand).

Los Angeles’ need for affordable housing multi-faceted. The undeveloped and underdeveloped land is hard to come by. Land Trusts can only acquire and retain so much land to keep affordable. Many non-profit, as well as for-profit developers, have worked hard to increase the supply of affordable housing (see photo: Casa Yondé, by Little Tokyo Service Center CDC), but their work will hit a major wall if Measure S passes. As a LEED Green Rater at Global Green, I know that 100% of the LEED-Certified Affordable Housing we certify requires a general plan amendment. On average, we certify 650 units of Green Affordable housing in southern California per year. If Measure S passes, that’s 1,300 units that won’t be available for those who need housing the most- families making less than $63,000 per year.

We urge LA voters, Vote NO on S March 7.