Global Green USA's New Orleans Director Beth Galante Honored at the White House

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GLOBAL GREEN USA’S NEW ORLEANS DIRECTOR BETH GALANTE HONORED AT WHITE HOUSE AS “CHAMPION OF CHANGE” 

CALLS FOR RESTORATION OF ECOSYSTEMS & INVESTMENT IN SAFE, CLEAN ENERGY FUTURE FOR THE GULF

July 19, 2011 - Washington, D.C. –Global Green USA’s New Orleans Director Beth Galante is being honored today at the White House as a “Champion of Change.”  Galante will be recognized along with four other New Orleans-area residents for their work to strengthen the local economy, create jobs and help the Gulf Coast recover from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. 

Galante is being honored for her work building energy-efficient, affordable homes for displaced New Orleanians as part of Global Green President Matt Petersen’s vision and six-year initiative to rebuild New Orleans as a model green city post-Katrina. Galante is also participating in the Gulf Coast Sustainable Economies Roundtable at the White House. The roundtable brings local leaders from around the Gulf Coast together to share best practices and connect them to the resources they need to undertake successful economic development projects and create jobs. 

The White House Champions of Change initiative profiles Americans from all walks of life who are helping the country rise to the challenges of the 21stcentury. These Champions of Change are doing extraordinary things in their communities to innovate, educate and build a better America. For more on Champions of Change, please visit http://www.whitehouse.gov/champions. 

“I am truly humbled and honored by this honor that I share with the staff and supporters of Global Green USA and with the thousands of my fellow New Orleanians who are tirelessly working every day to create a healthy, vibrant and sustainable Gulf Coast,” said Galante.

Additional honorees include Will BradshawByron Bishop, Carlton Dufrechou and Harlon Pearce. “Will, Beth, Byron, Carlton and Harlon are true Champions of Change,” said Jeffrey King, the Executive Director of the Clean Economy Development Center. “Their hard work and dedication have been instrumental to helping the Gulf Coast recover. Not only are they all helping their local community and region recover and rebuild, but also they are helping their country recover and grow.” 

BACKGROUND

Time Magazine has said, “No organization is doing more to rebuild New Orleans green than Global Green USA.” Following the tragic BP Oil disaster, Global Green is using its extensive resources and understanding of the challenges and opportunities in New Orleans and the Gulf to call upon President Obama to create the “Gulf Coast Clean Energy and Healthy Communities Foundation”--to transform the Gulf Coast to the Green Coast by helping the hard working Americans in the Gulf lead us to a stronger and cleaner economy, support wetlands and ecosystem restoration, and create more resilient Gulf Coast communities.

Immediately after Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast on August 29, 2005, Global Green formulated a vision and a plan to find a silver--or green--lining in the disaster. Thanks to Global Green, numerous rebuilding projects in New Orleans are now offering critical solutions to how we create highly efficient green homes and schools, while at the same time aiding under-served and underprivileged communities.

GLOBAL GREEN USA

Global Green USA, the American arm of President Gorbachev¹s Green Cross International, was founded by Diane Meyer Simon in 1993, and is a national leader in creating smart solutions to climate change. For more than 15 years, Global Green's LEED-accredited staff has spearheaded applying green building technology to more than $20 billion in new schools and affordable housing construction, while advancing groundbreaking solar, green building, and energy efficiency legislation. Global Green opened a New Orleans office shortly after Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf and is collaborating with environmentalists, community developers, the Recovery School District, urban organizations, and others to create the building blocks for a climate friendly, model sustainable city for the 21st century.